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  • FBI denies link to leak of 12 million Apple codes

    posted by Keito
    2012-09-06 19:57:13
    Following on from the leaked Apple UDID codes earlier this week, the FBI has come out saying "We never had info in question. Bottom Line: TOTALLY FALSE"... Funny that! =) It couldn't possibly be that a 3 letter agency is lying to the public and gathering information about innocent civilians via any means at hand?... Could it?!

    The BBC covers it as such:


    'The FBI says there is "no evidence" that a hacker group gained access to 12 million identifying codes for Apple devices via an FBI agent's laptop.

    AntiSec, a hacker group, posted a file on the internet on Monday that it said contained more than one million of Apple's so-called UDID codes.

    UDIDs are a 40-character string unique to each Apple device.

    AntiSec said it gained the codes from the laptop of an FBI agent called Christopher Stangl.

    Mr Stangl works in the bureau's Regional Cyber Action Team, Wired Magazine reports.

    AntiSec suggested that the 12 million codes were being used by the FBI to track the associated users.

    Along with the posted file, the group said in a statement that it had only released one million IDs and had scrubbed identifying information, including full names, telephone numbers and addresses.

    Commenting on the AntiSec revelation, the FBI said it had no indication of any link to its agent or computer.

    "At this time there is no evidence indicating that an FBI laptop was compromised or that the FBI either sought or obtained this data," the bureau said in a statement on Tuesday.

    Peter Kruse, an e-crime specialist with CSIS Security Group in Denmark, tweeted on Tuesday that the leak "is real" and that he confirmed three of his own devices in the data.

    Johannes Ullrich of the SANS Internet Storm Center told the AFP that while "there is nothing else in the file that would implicate the FBI... it is not clear who would have a file like this".

    Hackers identifying themselves with AntiSec have made previous hits this year on the websites of Panda Labs' anti-malware products and New York Ironwork - a company that sells equipment to US police.'


    For those that want to take a look at the source of this leak, check it out here. It reads as follows...



    "Now I know what a ghost is. Unfinished business, that's what."
    ― Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------


    we share ideas sometimes through the voice of twitter.com/@AnonymousIRC
    so then there is where to look for news.


    So well, some of you know what we were at during these last long weeks, and
    probably less people know we were also testing new stuff and shits for our next
    iterations.
    so, whatever. Happy to bring this Special #FFF Edition to you (so special that's
    even not on friday), again for the utterly lulz.


    we have written our very honest statement here, ofc it was intended for those
    who are truely interested on reading it, for those fellows who dont give a fuck
    about ideology and who are just lurking for the candy, skip it and jump
    directly to the candy and lulzy part titled: Candy and Lulzy part. we hope you
    find it useful as well as funny. and for those who dont care about the whole
    fucking shit... wtf r u doing here?? go and download a movie.

    so here we go...


    /*
    just a comment: we are still waiting for published news about the
    $ 2 billions worth loans Assad has taken from Russia,
    mentioned on the syrian mails
    and also about the transfer of money to austrian banks etc....
    and also cocks...
    So, don't be lazy journos and look for them.
    */


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    a few words.
    "For when all else is done, on­ly words re­main. Words en­dure."
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


    In July 2012 NSA's General Keith Alexander (alias the Bilderberg Biddy) spoke
    at Defcon, the hacker conference in Las Vegas, wearing jeans and a cool EFF
    t-shirt (LOL. Wtf was that?). He was trying to seduce hackers into improving
    Internet security and colonoscopy systems, and to recruit them, ofc, for his
    future cyberwars. It was an amusing hypocritical attempt made by the system to
    flatter hackers into becoming tools for the state, while his so-righteous
    employer hunts any who doesn't bow to them like fucking dogs.

    Well...
    We got the message.
    We decided we'd help out Internet security by auditing FBI first. We all know
    by now they make Internet insecure on purpose to help their bottom line. But
    it's a shitty job, especially since they decided to hunt us down and jail our
    friends.

    It's the old double standard that has been around since the 80's. Govt Agencies
    are obsessed with witchhunts against hackers worldwide, whilst they also
    recruit hackers to carry out their own political agendas.

    You are forbidden to outsmart the system, to defy it, to work around it. In
    short, while you may hack for the status quo, you are forbidden to hack the
    status quo. Just do what you're told. Don't worry about dirty geopolitical
    games, that's business for the elite. They're the ones that give dancing orders
    to our favorite general, Keith, while he happily puts on a ballet tutu. Just
    dance along, hackers. Otherwise... well...

    In 1989 hagbard (23yrs old) was murdered after being involved into cold war spy
    games related to KGB and US. Tron, another hacker, was
    murdered in 1998 (aged 26) after messing around with a myriad of cryptographic
    stuff (yeah, it's usually a hot item) and after making cryptophon easily
    accesible for the masses. And then you have Gareth Williams (31), the GCHQ
    hacker murdered and "bagged" inside a MI6's "safe" house (we'd hate to see what
    the unsafe ones look like) in August of 2010 after talking about being curious
    about leaking something to Wikileaks with fellow hackers on irc. And the list
    goes on. It's easy to cover up when they want to, hackers often have complex
    personalities, so faking their suicide fits well.

    You are welcome to hack what the system wants you to hack. If not, you will be
    punished.

    Jeremy Hammond faces the rest of his productive life in prison for being an
    ideological motivated political dissident. He was twice jailed for following
    his own beliefs. He worked until the end to uncover corruption and the
    connivance between the state and big corporations. He denounces the abuses and
    bribes of the US prison system, and he's again facing that abuse and torture at
    the hands of authorities.

    Last year, Bradley Manning was tortured after allegedly giving WikiLeaks
    confidential data belonging to US govt... oh shit. The world shouldn't know how
    some soldiers enjoy killing people and even less when they kill journalists. Of
    course, the common housewife doesn't deserve to know the truth about the
    hypocrisy in the international diplomacy or how world dictators spend money in
    luxury whilst their own people starve. Yep, the truth belongs only to the
    elite, and if you are not part of them (forget it, that won't happen), fuck
    yourself.

    People are frustrated, they feel the system manipulating them more than ever.
    Never underestimate the power of frustrated people.
    For the last few years we have broke into systems belonging to Governments and
    Big corporations just to find out they are spending millions of tax dollars to
    spy on their citizens. They work to discredit dissenting voices. They pay their
    friends for overpriced and insecure networks and services.

    We showed how former govt and military officials were making new businesses
    using their government relationships.
    They funnel public money to their own interests for overpriced contracts for
    crap level services. They use those
    relationships to extra-officially resolve affairs involving their businesses.

    We exposed a criminal System eliminating those who think different;
    criminalizing them. This System won't tolerate those who dig for the truth, it
    can't. So no one has the right to question anything coming from this system. if
    you buy a piece of hardware or software you just need to use it as it was
    supposed to be used: anything else is forbidden.
    No tinkering allowed.

    If you buy a Playstation, you are not allowed to use it as you want to -- you
    can only use it the Sony wants you to. If you have found a way to improve
    something, just shut up. You are not allowed to share this info with anyone
    else and let them make improvements, too. We are not the real owners of
    anything anymore. We just borrow things from the System. Shiny, colorful
    things, we agree to play with for a fee. A fee for life.
    Because this system works only if you keep working to buy new things.
    Not important if they are good things, just buy new crap, even better like that.
    So everything gets outdated soon.


    You home, stuff, car and computer, you will pay for everything you have for all
    of your life. All the time: a monthly fee, forever until you die. That's the
    future; nothing is really yours. LAAS - Life As A Service.
    You will rent your life.

    And better hurry up and work all day if you want to stay alive. Work 'til
    you're exhausted and don't think. No -- thinking is bad. Play games instead, do
    drugs too, why not? Or go to the movies. The Entertainment Industry is here to
    resolve all your philosophical and trascendental problems. Shiny colorful crap.
    but please don't think too much.
    Thinking is dangerous.

    Accept the offer, it's the perfect deal.
    You get all those amazing shiny colorful beads.
    It will only cost you freedom...and your life.
    Indians did it with Manhattan.
    There's nothing to worry about it, is there?


    And what if you are a lone wolf who quietly outside the system, doing your own
    thing, without saying a word? They will be mad as hell. They will try to find
    you. You will be fucked up anyway, sooner or later. Because the system wants
    you clearly identified, with all your personal details well packed into a
    government database so it can make its watchdogs' lives easier.

    Security researchers are often questioned and their movements tracked by Secret
    Service, FBI and other shits. They are asked about their projects, who their
    clients are, who they are talking to, what they know about other hackers, etc..
    So be a good monkey, follow the rules, head down and you'll get some coins
    that let you keep renting your life.

    But hey! Wait...
    We are hackers...
    We are supposed to look beyond the rules, to find things others don't see. And
    THE SYSTEM, yeah the whole fucking system, it's just another system.
    ...and we do that.
    we hack systems.

    This is our next challenge: to decide whether to become tools for the system,
    or for ourselves. The system plans to use us to hold the next in their endless
    wars, their cyberwars.
    Hackers vs. hackers, slaves vs slaves.

    We are trapped.

    Jack Henry Abbott, a writer who was incarcerated almost his whole life for his
    crimes, wrote before hanging himself: "As long as I am nothing but a ghost of
    the civil dead, I can do nothing…", the 'civil dead' are those, like himself,
    who had their autonomy systematically destroyed by the state. Now his words
    extend to cover all of us. We have seen our own autonomy being systematically
    destroyed by the State. We are becoming ghosts of our dead civil rights.

    criminals.
    So yes we are criminals, we are the criminals our dear system have created:
    Argumentum ad Baculum

    In a world where you fear the words you use to express yourself. Where you are
    punished for choosing the wrong ones, we have just decided to follow our own
    way. There's no worst kind of slavery than one where you are afraid of your own
    thoughts.

    Governments around the globe are already in control of us in real life, and
    they have now declared war on the people to take over the Internet.
    It's happening now. It's not waiting for you to wake up.
    So now my dear friends, it's your turn to decide where you belong,
    and what you are made of.



    "When the people fear the government there is tyranny, when the government
    fears the people there is liberty."
    ― Thomas Jefferson






    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CANDY! CANDY! CANDY!...............candy.


    Download links:

    http://freakshare.com/files/6gw0653b/Rxdzz.txt.html
    http://u32.extabit.com/go/28du69vxbo4ix/?upld=1
    http://d01.megashares.com/dl/22GofmH/Rxdzz.txt
    http://minus.com/l3Q9eDctVSXW3
    https://minus.com/mFEx56uOa
    http://uploadany.com/?d=50452CCA1
    http://www.ziddu.com/download/20266246/Rxdzz.txt.html
    http://www.sendmyway.com/2bmtivv6vhub/Rxdzz.txt.html

    HOW TO GET THE CANDY ONCE YOU HAVE DOWNLOADED THE FILE

    first check the file MD5:
    e7d0984f7bb632ee19d8dda1337e9fba

    (lol yes, a "1337" there for the lulz, God is in the detail)

    then decrypt the file using openssl:
    openssl aes-256-cbc -d -a -in file.txt -out decryptedfile.tar.gz

    password is:
    antis3cs5clockTea#579d8c28d34af73fea4354f5386a06a6

    then uncompress:
    tar -xvzf decryptedfile.tar.gz

    and then check file integrity using the MD5 included in the password u used to
    decrypt before:
    579d8c28d34af73fea4354f5386a06a6
    ^ yeah that one.

    if everything looks fine
    then perhaps it is.

    enjoy it!

    there you have. 1,000,001 Apple Devices UDIDs linking to their users and their
    APNS tokens.
    the original file contained around 12,000,000 devices. we decided a million would be
    enough to release.
    we trimmed out other personal data as, full names, cell numbers, addresses,
    zipcodes, etc.
    not all devices have the same amount of personal data linked. some devices
    contained lot of info.
    others no more than zipcodes or almost anything. we left those main columns we
    consider enough to help a significant amount of users to look if their devices
    are listed there or not. the DevTokens are included for those mobile hackers
    who could figure out some use from the dataset.


    file contains details to identify Apple devices.
    ordered by:

    Apple Device UDID, Apple Push Notification Service DevToken, Device Name,
    Device Type.



    We never liked the concept of UDIDs since the beginning indeed.
    Really bad decision from Apple.
    fishy thingie.


    so the big question:
    why exposing this personal data?
    well we have learnt it seems quite clear nobody pays attention if you just come
    and say 'hey, FBI is using your device details and info and who the fuck knows
    what the hell are they experimenting with that', well sorry, but nobody will care.
    FBI will, as usual, deny or ignore this uncomfortable thingie and everybody will
    forget the whole thing at amazing speed. so next option, we could have released
    mail and a very small extract of the data. some people would eventually pick up
    the issue but well, lets be honest, that will be ephemeral too.
    So without even being sure if the current choice will guarantee that people
    will pay attention to this fucking shouted
    'FUCKING FBI IS USING YOUR DEVICE INFO FOR A TRACKING PEOPLE PROJECT OR SOME
    SHIT' well at least it seems our best bet, and even in this
    case we will probably see their damage control teams going hard lobbying media
    with bullshits to discredit this, but well, whatever, at least we tried and
    eventually, looking at the massive number of devices concerned, someone should
    care about it. Also we think it's the right moment to release this knowing that
    Apple is looking for alternatives for those UDID currently and since a while
    blocked axx to it, but well, in this case it's too late for those concerned
    owners on the list. we always thought it was a really bad idea. that hardware
    coded IDs for devices concept should be erradicated from any device on the
    market in the future.

    so now candy was delivered.
    few words, and just a few, about how the shit came. we don't like too much
    about disclosing this part, we understood it would be needed, so, fuck
    whatever. lost asset. Hope it serves for something.


    During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by
    Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action
    Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team was breached using the
    AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability on Java, during the shell session some files
    were downloaded from his Desktop folder one of them with the name of
    "NCFTA_iOS_devices_intel.csv" turned to be a list of 12,367,232 Apple iOS
    devices including Unique Device Identifiers (UDID), user names, name of device,
    type of device, Apple Push Notification Service tokens, zipcodes, cellphone
    numbers, addresses, etc. the personal details fields referring to people
    appears many times empty leaving the whole list incompleted on many parts. no
    other file on the same folder makes mention about this list or its purpose.




    so...penis.



    to journalists: no more interviews to anyone till Adrian Chen get featured in
    the front page of Gawker, a whole day, with a huge picture of him dressing a
    ballet tutu and shoe on the head, no photoshop. yeah, man. like Keith
    Alexander. go, go, go.
    (and there you ll get your desired pageviews number too) Until that happens,
    this whole statement will be the only thing getting out
    directly from us. So no tutu, no sources.

    Our support to Wikileaks and Julian Assange.

    respect to Tunisian and Egyptian people, keep the good fight. Dont accept new
    oppressors in the place of the old ones.

    To Syrian rebels: If Assad wins he will exterminate all of you till the very
    last one, so better go and kill the motherfucker and his
    bunch of suckers for once.

    Support to Pussy Riot: Hang in there, babes! Resistance forever.


    we r sorry mike about what happened to you and princess.
    we didnt want to bring you in troubles with the feds
    and we ve heard about the reasons leading you to have spoken out to them,
    it's sad you ve just hanged around couple of weeks with us
    (we vagely understood u felt misplaced),
    but looking back to some events, at the end, it was also a good choice for
    everyone.
    hope u finish understanding it's not about the things we think we have seen.
    its always about those things we dont see.
    theres always another behind behind the behind.

    Greetings to all other groups struggling on their daily fight.
    Remember that fights between us it's what our adversaries are looking for.
    Now this is your time.


    "This is the highest wisdom that I own; freedom and life are earned by those
    alone who conquer them each day anew."
    Goethe

    LulzSec, AntiSec, LulzXmas series, ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US,
    MegaCockLulzFestival, "I'm 12 and wat iz diz?", CIA Tango Down,
    #FuckFBIFriday, #StratforHasTheButtInFlames, #BlueHairedAaronBarr,
    #WestboroChurchLovesEatingCocks, White Hats Can't Jump, "Keith Alexander
    dressing an exhuberant ballet tutu" image and others are all trademarks of
    Anonymous Inc. and well...all the people in general...


    Romney aber, sag's ihm, er kann mich im Arsche lecken!

    Disclaimer: We like beer and the use of manipulated bacterial ADN to transmit
    encrypted data.


    ...

    well that's all now we can move on and go to sleep.

  • Sworn Declaration of Whistleblower William Binney on NSA Domestic Surveillance Capabilities

    posted by Keito
    2012-09-04 20:30:23
    The following sworn declaration of William Binney, a former employee of the NSA and specialist in traffic analysis, was filed July 2, 2012 in support of the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s case against the National Security Agency (Jewel v. NSA) regarding their illegal domestic surveillance programs which, according to Binney “are consistent, as a mathematical matter, with seizing both the routing information and the contents of all electronic communications” inside the U.S. Thanks to Jacob Appelbaum for originally drawing attention to the declaration.


    I, William Binney, declare:

    1. I am a former employee of the National Security Agency (“NSA”), the signals intelligence agency within the Department of Defense. Unless otherwise indicated, I have personal knowledge of each and every fact set forth below and can competently testify thereto.

    2. A true and correct copy of my resume is attached hereto as Exhibit A.

    3. In the late 1990′s, the increasing use of the Internet for communications presented the NSA with a special kind of problem: The NSA could not collect and smartly select from the large volume of data traversing the Internet the nuggets of needed information about “Entities of Interest” or “Communities of Interest,” while protecting the privacy of U.S. persons. Human analysts had to manually identify the groups and entities associated with activities that the NSA sought to monitor. That process was so laborious that it significantly hampered the NSA’s ability to do large scale data analysis.

    4. One of my roles at the NSA was to find a means of automating the work of human analysts. I supervised and participated in the development of a program called “Thin Thread” within the NSA. Thin Thread was designed to identify networks of connections between individuals from their electronic communications over the Internet in an automated fashion in real time. The concept was for devices running Thin Thread to monitor international communications traffic passing over the Internet. Where one side of an international communication was domestic, the NSA had to comply with the requirements of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (“FISA”). With Thin Thread, the data would be encrypted (and the privacy of U.S. citizens protected) until such time as a warrant could be obtained from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Comi.

    5. The advent of the September 11 attacks brought a complete change in the approach 18 of the NSA toward doing its job. FISA ceased to be an operative concern, and the individual liberties preserved in the U.S. Constitution were no longer a consideration. It was at that time that the NSA began to implement the group of intelligence activities now known as the President’s Surveillance Program (“PSP”). While I was not personally read into the PSP, various members of my Thin Thread team were given the task of implementing various aspects of the PSP. They confided in me and told me that the PSP involved the collection of domestic electronic communications traffic without any of the privacy protections built into Thin Thread.

    6. I resigned from the NSA in late 2001. I could not stay after the NSA began purposefully violating the Constitution.

    7. The NSA chose not to implement Thin Thread. To the best of my knowledge, the NSA does not have a means of analyzing Internet data for the purpose of identifying Entities or Communities of Interest in real time. The NSA has the capability to do individualized searches, similar to Google, for particular electronic communications in real time through such criteria as target addresses, locations, countries and phone numbers, as well as watch-listed names, keywords, and phrases in email. The NSA also has the capability to seize and store most electronic communications passing through its U.S. intercept centers. The wholesale collection of data allows the NSA to identify and analyze Entities or Communities of interest later in a static database. Based on my proximity to the PSP and my years of experience at the NSA, I can draw informed conclusions from the available facts. Those facts indicate that the NSA is doing both.

    8. The NSA could have installed its intercept equipment at the nation’s fiber-optic cable landing stations. See Greg’s Cable Map, cablemap.info. There are more than two dozen such sites on the U.S. coasts where fiber-optic cables come ashore. If the NSA had taken that route, it would have been able to limit its interception of electronic communications to international/international and international/domestic communications and exclude domestic/domestic communications. Instead the NSA chose to put its intercept equipment at key junction points (for example Folsom Street) and probably throughout the nation, thereby giving itself access to purely domestic communications. The conclusion of J. Scott Marcus in his declaration that the “collection of infrastructure … has all the capability necessary to conduct large scale covert gathering of IP-based communications information, not only for communications to overseas locations, but .for purely domestic communications as well,” is correct.

    9. I estimate that the NSA installed no fewer than ten and possibly in excess of twenty intercept centers within the United States. I am familiar with the contents of Mark Klein’s declaration. The AT&T center on Folsom Street in San Francisco is one of the NSA intercept centers. Mr. Klein indicated that the NSA’s equipment intercepted Internet traffic on AT&T’s peering network. It makes sense for the NSA to intercept traffic on AT &T’s peering network. The idea would be to avoid having to install interception equipment on each of the thousands of parallel data lines that eventually lead into and out of peering networks. By focusing on peering networks, the NSA intercepts data at the choke point in the system through which all data must pass in order to move from one party’s network to another’s. This is particularly important because a block data is often broken up into many smaller packets for transmission. These packets may traverse different routes before reaching the destination computer which gathers them and reassembles the original block.

    10. One of the most notable pieces of equipment identified in Mr. Klein’s declaration is the NARUS Semantic Traffic Analyzer. According to the NARUS website, each NARUS device collects telecommunications data at the rate of ten gigabits per second and organizes the data into coherent streams based on the protocol associated with a specific type of collected data. A protocol is an agreed-upon way for data to be broken down into packets for transmission over the Internet, for the packets to be routed over the Internet to a designated destination and for the packets to be re-assembled at its destination. Protocols exist at each layer of the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) 7-layer telecommunications model and are used for a wide variety of data, not just electronic communications. That means that NARUS can reconstruct all information transmitted through the peering network and forward all of the electronic communications to a database for analysis. The NARUS device can also select predetermined data from that path and forward the data to organizations having interest in the data. As I indicated above, the predetermined data would involve target addresses, locations, countries, and phone numbers, as well as watch-listed names, keywords, and phrases.

    11. A further notable development has been the NSA’s public announcement in October 2009 that it was building a massive, $1.2 billion digital storage facility in Ft. Williams, Utah. According to some reports, the Utah facility will eventually have a data storage capacity measured in yottabytes (1024 bytes). Even if the Utah facility were to have no more than the amount of data storage that is presently commercially available, then one would expect the data storage to be in the range of multiples often exebytes (1018 bytes). See www.cleversafe.com. (According to Cleversafe, its ten exebyte storage solution fills no more than two hundred square feet). In April 2011, the NSA also announced that it would build a new supercomputing center at its Ft. Meade, Maryland headquarters.

    12. The amount of data that each NARUS device can process per second is large (10 gigabits is 10 billion bits). To illustrate the sheer size of the data storage capacity ofthe Utah facility, one could assume the installation of twenty-five NARUS devices in the U.S. and that all of 2 the NARUS-processed data is sent via fiber-optic cable to Utah. That means that the NARUS processing rate of 10 billion bits per second means that one machine can produce approximately 4 x 1016 bytes per year. That in turn means that it would take twenty-five devices one year to fill an exebyte or ten years to fill ten exebytes.

    13. The sheer size of that capacity indicates that the NSA is not filtering personal electronic communications such as email before storage but is, in fact, storing all that they are collecting. The capacity of NSA’s planned infrastructure far exceeds the capacity necessary for the storage of discreet, targeted communications or even for the storage of the routing information from all electronic communications. The capacity of NSA’s planned infrastructure is consistent, as a mathematical matter, with seizing both the routing information and the contents of all electronic communications.

    Download PDF

    http://publicintelligence.net/binney-nsa-declaration/
  • FBI Muslim spying lawsuit against U.S. is tossed by judge

    posted by Keito
    2012-08-26 09:35:59
    This line says it all really: "the state secrets privilege may unfortunately mean the sacrifice of individual liberties for the sake of national security."

    Basically, forget any rights you once had, the US Government can now throw out any case against it in the interests of National Security.

    Freedom and liberty are dead... All in the name of keeping 'freedom' and 'liberty' safe from terrorism. Funny that. It's quite obvious the biggest threat to freedom and liberty in democratic countries of the west are our own politicians. Revoking liberties and rights in an ongoing attempt to see and hear everything we do, just in case we happen to be a terrorist.

    I don't know about you, but I'd much rather live in a free country, that holds freedom and liberty in the highest of regards. The threat of terror is minuscule, we've lived through it in the UK for decades (during many years of heated IRA conflict) and not lost our collective minds in order to feel a little safer. Revoking such freedoms in order to feel a little safer will ultimately see us living in a police state.

    As Benjamin Franklin once stated: "Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both."

    The WTC attacks have proved mighty useful in the US Governments continued and systematic attacks on individual freedoms. Looks like someone's been taking lesson's from history, seeing how they might benefit the current regime.

    ***

    'A federal judge Tuesday threw out a lawsuit filed against the U.S. government and the FBI over the agency’s spying on Orange County Muslims, ruling that allowing the suit to go forward would risk divulging sensitive state secrets.

    Comparing himself to Odysseus navigating the waters between a six-headed monster and a deadly whirlpool, U.S. District Court Judge Cormac Carney wrote that “the state secrets privilege may unfortunately mean the sacrifice of individual liberties for the sake of national security.”

    The judge said that he reached the decision reluctantly after reviewing confidential declarations filed by top FBI officials, and that he was convinced the operation in question involved “intelligence that, if disclosed, would significantly compromise national security.”

    Carney allowed the suit to stand against individual FBI agents and supervisors on Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act-related claims.

    The class-action lawsuit was brought by a group of Orange County Muslims who contended that their constitutional rights were trampled when the FBI sent an undercover informant into their midst to illegally spy on them.

    The controversy revolves around the actions of Craig Monteilh, who alleges that he posed as a Muslim convert at the behest of the FBI to collect information at Orange County mosques. The American Civil Liberties Union and the Council on American-Islamic Relations sued on behalf of community members who alleged that the FBI engaged in a “dragnet” investigation that indiscriminately targeted Muslims based on their religion, planted bugs in offices and homes, and listened in on private religious conversations.

    The U.S. government asserted the state secrets privilege in the case, contending that divulging their targets in counterterrorism investigations, as well as how and why, would endanger national security.

    Monteilh, a convict who the FBI acknowledges worked as an informant on a case dubbed Operation Flex, has since taken his story public and filed lengthy court papers for the ACLU outlining his FBI work.

    “That information could cause harm for years to come,” Department of Justice attorney Anthony Coppolino told Carney in court Tuesday.

    While acknowledging that asserting the state secrets privilege could be seen as “unfair or harsh,” Coppolino said it was necessary for the greater public good.

    ACLU attorney Ahilan Arulanantham argued that the government should not be allowed to “shut the courthouse door” simply by citing national security. “It’s contrary to the basic notion that the judiciary determines what the law is and holds the government to it,” he said. “We’re exempting huge swaths of government activity to judicial oversight.”'

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/08/fbi.html
  • The NSA Domestic Spying Program: The program Binney created for foreign intelligence gathering was turned inward on his own country

    posted by Keito
    2012-08-24 19:42:22
    'It took me a few days to work up the nerve to phone William Binney. As someone already a “target” of the United States government, I found it difficult not to worry about the chain of unintended consequences I might unleash by calling Mr. Binney, a 32-year veteran of the National Security Agency turned whistle-blower. He picked up. I nervously explained I was a documentary filmmaker and wanted to speak to him. To my surprise he replied: “I’m tired of my government harassing me and violating the Constitution. Yes, I’ll talk to you.”

    Two weeks later, driving past the headquarters of the N.S.A. in Maryland, outside Washington, Mr. Binney described details about Stellar Wind, the N.S.A.’s top-secret domestic spying program begun after 9/11, which was so controversial that it nearly caused top Justice Department officials to resign in protest, in 2004.

    “The decision must have been made in September 2001,” Mr. Binney told me and the cinematographer Kirsten Johnson. “That’s when the equipment started coming in.” In this Op-Doc, Mr. Binney explains how the program he created for foreign intelligence gathering was turned inward on this country. He resigned over this in 2001 and began speaking out publicly in the last year. He is among a group of N.S.A. whistle-blowers, including Thomas A. Drake, who have each risked everything — their freedom, livelihoods and personal relationships — to warn Americans about the dangers of N.S.A. domestic spying.

    To those who understand state surveillance as an abstraction, I will try to describe a little about how it has affected me. The United States apparently placed me on a “watch-list” in 2006 after I completed a film about the Iraq war. I have been detained at the border more than 40 times. Once, in 2011, when I was stopped at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York and asserted my First Amendment right not to answer questions about my work, the border agent replied, “If you don’t answer our questions, we’ll find our answers on your electronics.”’ As a filmmaker and journalist entrusted to protect the people who share information with me, it is becoming increasingly difficult for me to work in the United States. Although I take every effort to secure my material, I know the N.S.A. has technical abilities that are nearly impossible to defend against if you are targeted.

    The 2008 amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which oversees the N.S.A. activities, are up for renewal in December. Two members of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Senators Ron Wyden of Oregon and Mark Udall of Colorado, both Democrats, are trying to revise the amendments to insure greater privacy protections. They have been warning about “secret interpretations” of laws and backdoor “loopholes” that allow the government to collect our private communications. Thirteen senators have signed a letter expressing concern about a “loophole” in the law that permits the collection of United States data. The A.C.L.U. and other groups have also challenged the constitutionality of the law, and the Supreme Court will hear arguments in that case on Oct. 29.

    Laura Poitras is a documentary filmmaker who has been nominated for an Academy Award and whose work was exhibited in the 2012 Whitney Biennial. She is working on a trilogy of films about post-9/11 America. This Op-Doc is adapted from a work in progress to be released in 2013.'

    https://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/23/opinion/the-national-security-agencys-domestic-spying-program.html