Blog

  • Has Apple Peaked?

    posted by Keito
    2012-09-26 21:15:00
    'If Steve Jobs were still alive, would the new map application on the iPhone 5 be such an unmitigated disaster? Interesting question, isn’t it?

    As Apple’s chief executive, Jobs was a perfectionist. He had no tolerance for corner-cutting or mediocre products. The last time Apple released a truly substandard product — MobileMe, in 2008 — Jobs gathered the team into an auditorium, berated them mercilessly and then got rid of the team leader in front of everybody, according to Walter Isaacson’s biography of Jobs. The three devices that made Apple the most valuable company in America — the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad — were all genuine innovations that forced every other technology company to play catch-up.

    No doubt, the iPhone 5, which went on sale on Friday, will be another hit. Apple’s halo remains powerful. But there is nothing about it that is especially innovative. Plus, of course, it has that nasty glitch. In rolling out a new operating system for the iPhone 5, Apple replaced Google’s map application — the mapping gold standard — with its own, vastly inferior, application, which has infuriated its customers. With maps now such a critical feature of smartphones, it seems to be an inexplicable mistake.

    And maybe that’s all it is — a mistake, soon to be fixed. But it is just as likely to turn out to be the canary in the coal mine. Though Apple will remain a highly profitable company for years to come, I would be surprised if it ever gives us another product as transformative as the iPhone or the iPad.

    Part of the reason is obvious: Jobs isn’t there anymore. It is rare that a company is so completely an extension of one man’s brain as Apple was an extension of Jobs. While he was alive, that was a strength; now it’s a weakness. Apple’s current executive team is no doubt trying to maintain the same demanding, innovative culture, but it’s just not the same without the man himself looking over everybody’s shoulder. If the map glitch tells us anything, it is that.

    But there is also a less obvious — yet possibly more important — reason that Apple’s best days may soon be behind it. When Jobs returned to the company in 1997, after 12 years in exile, Apple was in deep trouble. It could afford to take big risks and, indeed, to search for a new business model, because it had nothing to lose.

    Fifteen years later, Apple has a hugely profitable business model to defend — and a lot to lose. Companies change when that happens. “The business model becomes a gilded cage, and management won’t do anything to challenge it, while doing everything they can to protect it,” says Larry Keeley, an innovation strategist at Doblin, a consulting firm.

    It happens in every industry, but it is especially easy to see in technology because things move so quickly. It was less than 15 years ago that Microsoft appeared to be invincible. But once its Windows operating system and Office applications became giant moneymakers, Microsoft’s entire strategy became geared toward protecting its two cash cows. It ruthlessly used its Windows platform to promote its own products at the expense of rivals. (The Microsoft antitrust trial took dead aim at that behavior.) Although Microsoft still makes billions, its new products are mainly “me-too” versions of innovations made by other companies.

    Now it is Apple’s turn to be king of the hill — and, not surprisingly, it has begun to behave in a very similar fashion. You can see it in the patent litigation against Samsung, a costly and counterproductive exercise that has nothing to do with innovation and everything to do with protecting its turf.

    And you can see it in the decision to replace Google’s map application. Once an ally, Google is now a rival, and the thought of allowing Google to promote its maps on Apple’s platform had become anathema. More to the point, Apple wants to force its customers to use its own products, even when they are not as good as those from rivals. Once companies start acting that way, they become vulnerable to newer, nimbler competitors that are trying to create something new, instead of milking the old. Just ask BlackBerry, which once reigned supreme in the smartphone market but is now roadkill for Apple and Samsung.

    Even before Jobs died, Apple was becoming a company whose main goal was to defend its business model. Yes, he would never have allowed his minions to ship such an embarrassing application. But despite his genius, it is unlikely he could have kept Apple from eventually lapsing into the ordinary. It is the nature of capitalism that big companies become defensive, while newer rivals emerge with better, smarter ideas.

    “Oh my god,” read one Twitter message I saw. “Apple maps is the worst ever. It is like using MapQuest on a BlackBerry.”

    MapQuest and BlackBerry.

    Exactly.'

    https://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/22/opinion/nocera-has-apple-peaked.html
  • Google agrees to pay largest fine in FTC history for bypassing Safari privacy settings

    posted by Keito
    2012-09-26 21:07:05
    'Google on Thursday agreed to pay a record $22.5 million fine for ignoring security settings designed to prevent advertisers from tracking users with cookies in Apple's Safari web browser, bringing an end to a six month investigation aimed at better protecting consumers' privacy rights online.

    ### FTC members conflicted over settlement

    The penalty imposed by the United States Federal Trade Commission is the largest the agency has ever issued and the first for violations of its Internet privacy order.

    Despite the record setting fine, FTC members issued a statement (PDF) noting that the fine posed no serious threat to the company, and that Google agreed to pay the fine only if it could "denial of the substantive allegations in the Commission’s civil penalty complaint."

    Commissioner J. Thomas Rosch voted against the order, arguing that the FTC's settlement with Google was not in the public interest, primarily because it allowed Google to deny the allegations raised by the FTC.

    The FTC wasn't just responding to Google's bypassing of Safari settings. Instead, the settlement involved the larger issue of an agreement the FTC made with Google last year addressing the privacy of users. Google's willful bypassing of Safari's settings violated that earlier consent order, the commission determined.

    Allowing Google to deny liability while still paying a fine divided the Commission members 4 to 1 against Rosch. "We strongly disagree with Commissioner Rosch’s view that if the Commission allows a defendant to deny the complaint’s substantive allegations, the settlement is not in the public interest," other members wrote.

    "Here, as in all cases, a defendant’s denial of liability in a settlement agreement has no bearing on the Commission’s determination as to whether it has reason to believe the defendant has violated the law or that a proposed settlement will afford appropriate relief for the Commission’s charges."

    ### Google's lying to users deemed more serious than feeding them ads they didn't want

    Commission members noted that the heart of the charges were aimed, not at Google's continuing to collect identifying data through cookies, but primarily at Google's false instructions to Safari users telling them that they didn't need to opt out because, Google had lied, Apple's default Safari settings were being respected by the company and that no further action on users' part was necessary.

    Commissioners who voted for the deal wrote that "the historic $22.5 million fine is an appropriate remedy for our charge that Google violated a Commission order by misrepresenting to Safari browser users how to avoid targeted advertising by Google."

    "In our view," they added, "the most important question is whether Google will abide by the underlying FTC consent order going forward."

    ### There's more where that came from

    "We firmly believe that the Commission’s swift imposition of a $22.5 million fine helps to promote such future compliance," the group stated in response to Rosch's opposition to the settlement. "With a company of Google’s size, almost any penalty can be dismissed as insufficient.

    "But it is hardly inconsequential to impose a $22.5 million civil penalty when the accompanying complaint does not allege that the conduct at issue yielded significant revenue or endured for a significant period of time.

    "This settlement is intended to provide a strong message to Google and other companies under order that their actions will be under close scrutiny and that the Commission will respond to violations quickly and vigorously."

    Google remains under its consent order, and the FTC has left the door open to additional fines if the search giant continues to violate its agreement with the government not to bypass the rights of users and lie to them about what they are doing or provide false instructions about how to opt out of Google's data collections.

    ### Busted by Old Media

    Google's investigation by the FTC, initiated in February, followed a Wall Street Journal investigation that alleged Google and other ad networks had bypassed Safari's security protocols, violating its October 2011 privacy settlement with the FTC.

    Specifically, the FTC charged that for several months in 2011 and 2012, Google placed a certain advertising tracking cookie on the computers of Safari users who visited sites within Google’s DoubleClick advertising network. It did so, the agency asserted, despite previous promises to Safari users that they would automatically be opted out of such tracking as a result of the default settings in Safari on Macs, iPhones and iPads.

    "The record setting penalty in this matter sends a clear message to all companies under an FTC privacy order," said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz. "No matter how big or small, all companies must abide by FTC orders against them and keep their privacy promises to consumers, or they will end up paying many times what it would have cost to comply in the first place."

    ### Google denied wrongdoing early and often

    For its part, Google in a statement to AppleInsider previously denied the claims waged by the Journal, alleging the paper "mischaracterizes what happened and why." The company issued a statement saying:



    We used known Safari functionality to provide features that signed-in Google users had enabled. It’s important to stress that these advertising cookies do not collect personal information.

    Unlike other major browsers, Apple’s Safari browser blocks third-party cookies by default. However, Safari enables many web features for its users that rely on third parties and third-party cookies, such as “Like” buttons. Last year, we began using this functionality to enable features for signed-in Google users on Safari who had opted to see personalized ads and other content--such as the ability to “+1” things that interest them.

    To enable these features, we created a temporary communication link between Safari browsers and Google’s servers, so that we could ascertain whether Safari users were also signed into Google, and had opted for this type of personalization. But we designed this so that the information passing between the user’s Safari browser and Google’s servers was anonymous--effectively creating a barrier between their personal information and the web content they browse.

    However, the Safari browser contained functionality that then enabled other Google advertising cookies to be set on the browser. We didn’t anticipate that this would happen, and we have now started removing these advertising cookies from Safari browsers. It’s important to stress that, just as on other browsers, these advertising cookies do not collect personal information.



    ### Google floats above the law, pays millions only when caught

    Google's FTC fine pales in comparison to the $500 million forfeiture settlement it paid the US government after allowing a Canadian pharmacy to illegally advertise drugs in the United States, supporting the illegal import of prescription drugs and controlled substances into the country.

    That forfeiture, to avoid further litigation with the government, was also described as the largest ever of its kind. Google's criminal activity was only discovered after David Whitaker, the target of a multimillion dollar financial fraud scheme, was apprehended and confessed to federal investigators that he had been advertising illegal drugs using Google's AdWords program.

    Whitaker demonstrated to investigators how he had set up a number of websites using Google's AdWords to advertise illegal drugs. Further investigation revealed that Google knew about the fraudulent advertising as early as 2003, but failed to stop the online pharmacies because it was making money on them.

    The Canadian pharmacies Google assisted were not just skirting inconvenient laws to provide Americans with cheaper drugs. Instead, investigators noted that "Google was also on notice that many pharmacies accepting an online consultation rather than a prescription charged a premium for doing so because individuals seeking to obtain prescription drugs without a valid prescription were willing to pay higher prices for the drugs."

    Government investigators specifically noted that Google had acknowledged “that it improperly assisted Canadian online pharmacy advertisers," not only allowing them to place illegal AdWords advertisements, but that also "from 2003 through 2009, Google provided customer support to some of these Canadian online pharmacy advertisers to assist them in placing and optimizing their AdWords advertisements and in improving the effectiveness of their websites."
  • FBI denies link to leak of 12 million Apple codes

    posted by Keito
    2012-09-06 19:57:13
    Following on from the leaked Apple UDID codes earlier this week, the FBI has come out saying "We never had info in question. Bottom Line: TOTALLY FALSE"... Funny that! =) It couldn't possibly be that a 3 letter agency is lying to the public and gathering information about innocent civilians via any means at hand?... Could it?!

    The BBC covers it as such:


    'The FBI says there is "no evidence" that a hacker group gained access to 12 million identifying codes for Apple devices via an FBI agent's laptop.

    AntiSec, a hacker group, posted a file on the internet on Monday that it said contained more than one million of Apple's so-called UDID codes.

    UDIDs are a 40-character string unique to each Apple device.

    AntiSec said it gained the codes from the laptop of an FBI agent called Christopher Stangl.

    Mr Stangl works in the bureau's Regional Cyber Action Team, Wired Magazine reports.

    AntiSec suggested that the 12 million codes were being used by the FBI to track the associated users.

    Along with the posted file, the group said in a statement that it had only released one million IDs and had scrubbed identifying information, including full names, telephone numbers and addresses.

    Commenting on the AntiSec revelation, the FBI said it had no indication of any link to its agent or computer.

    "At this time there is no evidence indicating that an FBI laptop was compromised or that the FBI either sought or obtained this data," the bureau said in a statement on Tuesday.

    Peter Kruse, an e-crime specialist with CSIS Security Group in Denmark, tweeted on Tuesday that the leak "is real" and that he confirmed three of his own devices in the data.

    Johannes Ullrich of the SANS Internet Storm Center told the AFP that while "there is nothing else in the file that would implicate the FBI... it is not clear who would have a file like this".

    Hackers identifying themselves with AntiSec have made previous hits this year on the websites of Panda Labs' anti-malware products and New York Ironwork - a company that sells equipment to US police.'


    For those that want to take a look at the source of this leak, check it out here. It reads as follows...



    "Now I know what a ghost is. Unfinished business, that's what."
    ― Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------


    we share ideas sometimes through the voice of twitter.com/@AnonymousIRC
    so then there is where to look for news.


    So well, some of you know what we were at during these last long weeks, and
    probably less people know we were also testing new stuff and shits for our next
    iterations.
    so, whatever. Happy to bring this Special #FFF Edition to you (so special that's
    even not on friday), again for the utterly lulz.


    we have written our very honest statement here, ofc it was intended for those
    who are truely interested on reading it, for those fellows who dont give a fuck
    about ideology and who are just lurking for the candy, skip it and jump
    directly to the candy and lulzy part titled: Candy and Lulzy part. we hope you
    find it useful as well as funny. and for those who dont care about the whole
    fucking shit... wtf r u doing here?? go and download a movie.

    so here we go...


    /*
    just a comment: we are still waiting for published news about the
    $ 2 billions worth loans Assad has taken from Russia,
    mentioned on the syrian mails
    and also about the transfer of money to austrian banks etc....
    and also cocks...
    So, don't be lazy journos and look for them.
    */


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    a few words.
    "For when all else is done, on­ly words re­main. Words en­dure."
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------


    In July 2012 NSA's General Keith Alexander (alias the Bilderberg Biddy) spoke
    at Defcon, the hacker conference in Las Vegas, wearing jeans and a cool EFF
    t-shirt (LOL. Wtf was that?). He was trying to seduce hackers into improving
    Internet security and colonoscopy systems, and to recruit them, ofc, for his
    future cyberwars. It was an amusing hypocritical attempt made by the system to
    flatter hackers into becoming tools for the state, while his so-righteous
    employer hunts any who doesn't bow to them like fucking dogs.

    Well...
    We got the message.
    We decided we'd help out Internet security by auditing FBI first. We all know
    by now they make Internet insecure on purpose to help their bottom line. But
    it's a shitty job, especially since they decided to hunt us down and jail our
    friends.

    It's the old double standard that has been around since the 80's. Govt Agencies
    are obsessed with witchhunts against hackers worldwide, whilst they also
    recruit hackers to carry out their own political agendas.

    You are forbidden to outsmart the system, to defy it, to work around it. In
    short, while you may hack for the status quo, you are forbidden to hack the
    status quo. Just do what you're told. Don't worry about dirty geopolitical
    games, that's business for the elite. They're the ones that give dancing orders
    to our favorite general, Keith, while he happily puts on a ballet tutu. Just
    dance along, hackers. Otherwise... well...

    In 1989 hagbard (23yrs old) was murdered after being involved into cold war spy
    games related to KGB and US. Tron, another hacker, was
    murdered in 1998 (aged 26) after messing around with a myriad of cryptographic
    stuff (yeah, it's usually a hot item) and after making cryptophon easily
    accesible for the masses. And then you have Gareth Williams (31), the GCHQ
    hacker murdered and "bagged" inside a MI6's "safe" house (we'd hate to see what
    the unsafe ones look like) in August of 2010 after talking about being curious
    about leaking something to Wikileaks with fellow hackers on irc. And the list
    goes on. It's easy to cover up when they want to, hackers often have complex
    personalities, so faking their suicide fits well.

    You are welcome to hack what the system wants you to hack. If not, you will be
    punished.

    Jeremy Hammond faces the rest of his productive life in prison for being an
    ideological motivated political dissident. He was twice jailed for following
    his own beliefs. He worked until the end to uncover corruption and the
    connivance between the state and big corporations. He denounces the abuses and
    bribes of the US prison system, and he's again facing that abuse and torture at
    the hands of authorities.

    Last year, Bradley Manning was tortured after allegedly giving WikiLeaks
    confidential data belonging to US govt... oh shit. The world shouldn't know how
    some soldiers enjoy killing people and even less when they kill journalists. Of
    course, the common housewife doesn't deserve to know the truth about the
    hypocrisy in the international diplomacy or how world dictators spend money in
    luxury whilst their own people starve. Yep, the truth belongs only to the
    elite, and if you are not part of them (forget it, that won't happen), fuck
    yourself.

    People are frustrated, they feel the system manipulating them more than ever.
    Never underestimate the power of frustrated people.
    For the last few years we have broke into systems belonging to Governments and
    Big corporations just to find out they are spending millions of tax dollars to
    spy on their citizens. They work to discredit dissenting voices. They pay their
    friends for overpriced and insecure networks and services.

    We showed how former govt and military officials were making new businesses
    using their government relationships.
    They funnel public money to their own interests for overpriced contracts for
    crap level services. They use those
    relationships to extra-officially resolve affairs involving their businesses.

    We exposed a criminal System eliminating those who think different;
    criminalizing them. This System won't tolerate those who dig for the truth, it
    can't. So no one has the right to question anything coming from this system. if
    you buy a piece of hardware or software you just need to use it as it was
    supposed to be used: anything else is forbidden.
    No tinkering allowed.

    If you buy a Playstation, you are not allowed to use it as you want to -- you
    can only use it the Sony wants you to. If you have found a way to improve
    something, just shut up. You are not allowed to share this info with anyone
    else and let them make improvements, too. We are not the real owners of
    anything anymore. We just borrow things from the System. Shiny, colorful
    things, we agree to play with for a fee. A fee for life.
    Because this system works only if you keep working to buy new things.
    Not important if they are good things, just buy new crap, even better like that.
    So everything gets outdated soon.


    You home, stuff, car and computer, you will pay for everything you have for all
    of your life. All the time: a monthly fee, forever until you die. That's the
    future; nothing is really yours. LAAS - Life As A Service.
    You will rent your life.

    And better hurry up and work all day if you want to stay alive. Work 'til
    you're exhausted and don't think. No -- thinking is bad. Play games instead, do
    drugs too, why not? Or go to the movies. The Entertainment Industry is here to
    resolve all your philosophical and trascendental problems. Shiny colorful crap.
    but please don't think too much.
    Thinking is dangerous.

    Accept the offer, it's the perfect deal.
    You get all those amazing shiny colorful beads.
    It will only cost you freedom...and your life.
    Indians did it with Manhattan.
    There's nothing to worry about it, is there?


    And what if you are a lone wolf who quietly outside the system, doing your own
    thing, without saying a word? They will be mad as hell. They will try to find
    you. You will be fucked up anyway, sooner or later. Because the system wants
    you clearly identified, with all your personal details well packed into a
    government database so it can make its watchdogs' lives easier.

    Security researchers are often questioned and their movements tracked by Secret
    Service, FBI and other shits. They are asked about their projects, who their
    clients are, who they are talking to, what they know about other hackers, etc..
    So be a good monkey, follow the rules, head down and you'll get some coins
    that let you keep renting your life.

    But hey! Wait...
    We are hackers...
    We are supposed to look beyond the rules, to find things others don't see. And
    THE SYSTEM, yeah the whole fucking system, it's just another system.
    ...and we do that.
    we hack systems.

    This is our next challenge: to decide whether to become tools for the system,
    or for ourselves. The system plans to use us to hold the next in their endless
    wars, their cyberwars.
    Hackers vs. hackers, slaves vs slaves.

    We are trapped.

    Jack Henry Abbott, a writer who was incarcerated almost his whole life for his
    crimes, wrote before hanging himself: "As long as I am nothing but a ghost of
    the civil dead, I can do nothing…", the 'civil dead' are those, like himself,
    who had their autonomy systematically destroyed by the state. Now his words
    extend to cover all of us. We have seen our own autonomy being systematically
    destroyed by the State. We are becoming ghosts of our dead civil rights.

    criminals.
    So yes we are criminals, we are the criminals our dear system have created:
    Argumentum ad Baculum

    In a world where you fear the words you use to express yourself. Where you are
    punished for choosing the wrong ones, we have just decided to follow our own
    way. There's no worst kind of slavery than one where you are afraid of your own
    thoughts.

    Governments around the globe are already in control of us in real life, and
    they have now declared war on the people to take over the Internet.
    It's happening now. It's not waiting for you to wake up.
    So now my dear friends, it's your turn to decide where you belong,
    and what you are made of.



    "When the people fear the government there is tyranny, when the government
    fears the people there is liberty."
    ― Thomas Jefferson






    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CANDY! CANDY! CANDY!...............candy.


    Download links:

    http://freakshare.com/files/6gw0653b/Rxdzz.txt.html
    http://u32.extabit.com/go/28du69vxbo4ix/?upld=1
    http://d01.megashares.com/dl/22GofmH/Rxdzz.txt
    http://minus.com/l3Q9eDctVSXW3
    https://minus.com/mFEx56uOa
    http://uploadany.com/?d=50452CCA1
    http://www.ziddu.com/download/20266246/Rxdzz.txt.html
    http://www.sendmyway.com/2bmtivv6vhub/Rxdzz.txt.html

    HOW TO GET THE CANDY ONCE YOU HAVE DOWNLOADED THE FILE

    first check the file MD5:
    e7d0984f7bb632ee19d8dda1337e9fba

    (lol yes, a "1337" there for the lulz, God is in the detail)

    then decrypt the file using openssl:
    openssl aes-256-cbc -d -a -in file.txt -out decryptedfile.tar.gz

    password is:
    antis3cs5clockTea#579d8c28d34af73fea4354f5386a06a6

    then uncompress:
    tar -xvzf decryptedfile.tar.gz

    and then check file integrity using the MD5 included in the password u used to
    decrypt before:
    579d8c28d34af73fea4354f5386a06a6
    ^ yeah that one.

    if everything looks fine
    then perhaps it is.

    enjoy it!

    there you have. 1,000,001 Apple Devices UDIDs linking to their users and their
    APNS tokens.
    the original file contained around 12,000,000 devices. we decided a million would be
    enough to release.
    we trimmed out other personal data as, full names, cell numbers, addresses,
    zipcodes, etc.
    not all devices have the same amount of personal data linked. some devices
    contained lot of info.
    others no more than zipcodes or almost anything. we left those main columns we
    consider enough to help a significant amount of users to look if their devices
    are listed there or not. the DevTokens are included for those mobile hackers
    who could figure out some use from the dataset.


    file contains details to identify Apple devices.
    ordered by:

    Apple Device UDID, Apple Push Notification Service DevToken, Device Name,
    Device Type.



    We never liked the concept of UDIDs since the beginning indeed.
    Really bad decision from Apple.
    fishy thingie.


    so the big question:
    why exposing this personal data?
    well we have learnt it seems quite clear nobody pays attention if you just come
    and say 'hey, FBI is using your device details and info and who the fuck knows
    what the hell are they experimenting with that', well sorry, but nobody will care.
    FBI will, as usual, deny or ignore this uncomfortable thingie and everybody will
    forget the whole thing at amazing speed. so next option, we could have released
    mail and a very small extract of the data. some people would eventually pick up
    the issue but well, lets be honest, that will be ephemeral too.
    So without even being sure if the current choice will guarantee that people
    will pay attention to this fucking shouted
    'FUCKING FBI IS USING YOUR DEVICE INFO FOR A TRACKING PEOPLE PROJECT OR SOME
    SHIT' well at least it seems our best bet, and even in this
    case we will probably see their damage control teams going hard lobbying media
    with bullshits to discredit this, but well, whatever, at least we tried and
    eventually, looking at the massive number of devices concerned, someone should
    care about it. Also we think it's the right moment to release this knowing that
    Apple is looking for alternatives for those UDID currently and since a while
    blocked axx to it, but well, in this case it's too late for those concerned
    owners on the list. we always thought it was a really bad idea. that hardware
    coded IDs for devices concept should be erradicated from any device on the
    market in the future.

    so now candy was delivered.
    few words, and just a few, about how the shit came. we don't like too much
    about disclosing this part, we understood it would be needed, so, fuck
    whatever. lost asset. Hope it serves for something.


    During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by
    Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action
    Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team was breached using the
    AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability on Java, during the shell session some files
    were downloaded from his Desktop folder one of them with the name of
    "NCFTA_iOS_devices_intel.csv" turned to be a list of 12,367,232 Apple iOS
    devices including Unique Device Identifiers (UDID), user names, name of device,
    type of device, Apple Push Notification Service tokens, zipcodes, cellphone
    numbers, addresses, etc. the personal details fields referring to people
    appears many times empty leaving the whole list incompleted on many parts. no
    other file on the same folder makes mention about this list or its purpose.




    so...penis.



    to journalists: no more interviews to anyone till Adrian Chen get featured in
    the front page of Gawker, a whole day, with a huge picture of him dressing a
    ballet tutu and shoe on the head, no photoshop. yeah, man. like Keith
    Alexander. go, go, go.
    (and there you ll get your desired pageviews number too) Until that happens,
    this whole statement will be the only thing getting out
    directly from us. So no tutu, no sources.

    Our support to Wikileaks and Julian Assange.

    respect to Tunisian and Egyptian people, keep the good fight. Dont accept new
    oppressors in the place of the old ones.

    To Syrian rebels: If Assad wins he will exterminate all of you till the very
    last one, so better go and kill the motherfucker and his
    bunch of suckers for once.

    Support to Pussy Riot: Hang in there, babes! Resistance forever.


    we r sorry mike about what happened to you and princess.
    we didnt want to bring you in troubles with the feds
    and we ve heard about the reasons leading you to have spoken out to them,
    it's sad you ve just hanged around couple of weeks with us
    (we vagely understood u felt misplaced),
    but looking back to some events, at the end, it was also a good choice for
    everyone.
    hope u finish understanding it's not about the things we think we have seen.
    its always about those things we dont see.
    theres always another behind behind the behind.

    Greetings to all other groups struggling on their daily fight.
    Remember that fights between us it's what our adversaries are looking for.
    Now this is your time.


    "This is the highest wisdom that I own; freedom and life are earned by those
    alone who conquer them each day anew."
    Goethe

    LulzSec, AntiSec, LulzXmas series, ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US,
    MegaCockLulzFestival, "I'm 12 and wat iz diz?", CIA Tango Down,
    #FuckFBIFriday, #StratforHasTheButtInFlames, #BlueHairedAaronBarr,
    #WestboroChurchLovesEatingCocks, White Hats Can't Jump, "Keith Alexander
    dressing an exhuberant ballet tutu" image and others are all trademarks of
    Anonymous Inc. and well...all the people in general...


    Romney aber, sag's ihm, er kann mich im Arsche lecken!

    Disclaimer: We like beer and the use of manipulated bacterial ADN to transmit
    encrypted data.


    ...

    well that's all now we can move on and go to sleep.

  • Poor Civic Hygiene

    posted by Keito
    2012-09-05 21:58:14
  • No shooting at protest? Police may block mobile devices via Apple

    posted by Keito
    2012-09-05 21:52:31
    'Apple has patented a piece of technology which would allow government and police to block transmission of information, including video and photographs, from any public gathering or venue they deem “sensitive”, and “protected from externalities.”

    ­In other words, these powers will have control over what can and cannot be documented on wireless devices during any public event.

    And while the company says the affected sites are to be mostly cinemas, theaters, concert grounds and similar locations, Apple Inc. also says “covert police or government operations may require complete ‘blackout’ conditions.”

    “Additionally,” Apple says,” the wireless transmission of sensitive information to a remote source is one example of a threat to security. This sensitive information could be anything from classified government information to questions or answers to an examination administered in an academic setting.”

    The statement led many to believe that authorities and police could now use the patented feature during protests or rallies to block the transmission of video footage and photographs from the scene, including those of police brutality, which at times of major events immediately flood news networks and video websites.

    Apple patented the means to transmit an encoded signal to all wireless devices, commanding them to disable recording functions.

    Those policies would be activated by GPS, and WiFi or mobile base-stations, which would ring-fence ("geofence") around a building or a “sensitive area” to prevent phone cameras from taking pictures or recording video.

    Apple may implement the technology, but it would not be Apple's decision to activate the “feature” – it would be down governments, businesses and network owners to set such policies, analyzes ZDNet technology website.

    Having invented one of the most sophisticated mobile devices, Apple now appears to be looking for ways to restrict its use.

    “As wireless devices such as cellular telephones, pagers, personal media devices and smartphones become ubiquitous, more and more people are carrying these devices in various social and professional settings,” it explains in the patent. “The result is that these wireless devices can often annoy, frustrate, and even threaten people in sensitive venues.”

    The company’s listed “sensitive” venues so far include mostly meetings, the presentation of movies, religious ceremonies, weddings, funerals, academic lectures, and test-taking environments.'

    https://rt.com/news/apple-patent-transmission-block-408/