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  • The UK Government shames us all...

    posted by Keito
    2012-08-17 19:46:27
    I'm figuratively blown away by the amount of money being wasted to try to get hold of Julian Assange. What new depths will the UK stoop to? According to some reports it could cost the taxpayer £50,000/day. Whoever thinks this is a good way for our government to spend money needs their head examining.

    The government is so determined to secure his arrest, they plan to implement heat detection technologies to ensure he isn't smuggled out of the embassy via the use of a diplomatic package (which should be immune from interference anyway).

    I think we're about to see just how little the UK cares for abiding by international treaties and laws.

    Our arsehole government pandered to Pinochet, whose crimes were insurmountable. Yet, when it comes to extradition of a man for the lack of wearing a condom, well, the corrupt UK politicians seem willing to lube up and bend over for their White House overlords at the earliest possible convenience.

    Anyone who still thinks this whole Assange debacle has anything to do with a bullshit sex-crime is living in a dreamworld.

    Our politicians actions are defining a generation, our future... our children's future.

    They are paving the way for secrets, lies, war-crimes, injustice, corruption, corporate greed and control over our political stage by unscrupulous men and women. They are trying to send a message to any and all future human rights activists and freedom advocates.... You can't touch the evil governments of this world, they'll go to great lengths to shut you up. They'll break international law, they'll drop any and all diplomatic principles in their pursuit.

    Apparently the UK deems upholding some extradition law (over a bullshit made-up charge) is more important than internationally agreed treaties, laws and relations. We'd be willing to harm relations with an entire nation - at great risk, in order to see that one man is sent to a country to get - at worst - a fine.

    But we all know Assange won't get a fine, should he get extradited... he'll get some American Gulag, or the death penalty... all for showing the world that our beloved 'freedom-loving' western governments have much blood on their hands.

    Our politicians deserve locking up. Their actions are an outrage.
  • A Sullied Apple

    posted by Keito
    2012-08-17 19:03:59
  • Russia issues warning to Britain over Assange

    posted by Keito
    2012-08-17 18:53:16
    'Russia on Friday warned Britain against violating fundamental diplomatic principles after London suggested it could arrest WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange inside Ecuador's embassy.

    "What is happening gives grounds to contemplate the observance of the spirit and the letter of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, and in particular the Article 22 spelling out the inviolability of diplomatic premises," the Russian foreign ministry said.

    Ecuador on Thursday granted asylum to Assange -- whose website enraged the United States by publishing a vast cache of confidential government files -- but Britain has vowed not to grant him safe passage out of the country.

    British Foreign Secretary William Hague has said his government was obliged under its own law to extradite the Australian national to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning over alleged sex crimes.

    Britain has angered Ecuador by suggesting it could invoke a domestic law allowing it to breach the usual rules and go in to arrest Assange, who has been holed up in Ecuador's London mission since June.

    This would challenge a fundamental principle of the diplomatic system, and the threat has left Britain in unchartered legal waters.

    At the same time, Moscow warned Britain against interpreting the law selectively, stressing that London has given refuge to "dozens of people suspected of committing grave crimes" who are wanted in other countries.

    "What to do with a right to refuge for Julian Assange when London turns the observance of this right for this category of people into an absolute principle?" the Russian foreign ministry asked, referring to a number of high-profile figures granted asylum in Britain.

    Russia has for years sought the extradition of top Kremlin critic Boris Berezovsky as well as several other figures.'

    http://www.france24.com/en/20120817-russia-issues-warning-britain-over-assange
  • RT: UK threats help Assange cause; West hostile to whistleblowers

    posted by Keito
    2012-08-16 22:47:30
  • Ecuador grants Wikileaks founder asylum

    posted by Keito
    2012-08-16 14:58:29
    I can only commend the decision made by Ecuador to grant Julian Assange political asylum. I continue to be greatly disappointed in the UK government and judicial system, bowing to pressure from the war criminals in the west.

    ******

    'Ecuador has granted asylum to Wikileaks founder Julian Assange two months after he took refuge in its London embassy while fighting extradition from the UK.

    It said there were fears Mr Assange's human rights might be violated.

    Foreign minister Ricardo Patino accused the UK of making an "open threat" to enter its embassy to arrest him.

    Mr Assange took refuge at the embassy in June to avoid extradition to Sweden, where he faces questioning over assault and rape claims, which he denies.

    The Australian national said being granted political asylum by Ecuador was a "significant victory" and thanked staff in the Ecuadorian embassy in London.

    However, as the Foreign Office insisted the decision would not affect the UK's legal obligation to extradite him to Sweden, Mr Assange warned: "Things will get more stressful now."

    Announcing Ecuador's decision, Mr Patino said the country believed Mr Assange's fears of political persecution were "legitimate".

    He said the country was being loyal to its tradition of protecting those who were vulnerable.

    "We trust that our friendship with the United Kingdom will remain intact," he added.

    The announcement was watched live by Mr Assange and embassy staff in a link to a press conference from Quito.

    The Foreign Office said it was "disappointed" by the statement issued by Ecuador's foreign minister.

    It said in a statement: "Under our law, with Mr Assange having exhausted all options of appeal, the British authorities are under a binding obligation to extradite him to Sweden.

    "We shall carry out that obligation. The Ecuadorian government's decision this afternoon does not change that."

    The Foreign Office said it remained committed to reaching a "negotiated solution" that allows it to carry it "obligations under the Extradition Act".

    It means Mr Assange's arrest would still be sought if he leaves the embassy.

    On Twitter, Sweden's foreign minister, Carl Bildt, said the country's "firm legal and constitutional system guarantees the rights of each and everyone".

    "We firmly reject any accusations to the contrary."

    Outside Ecuador's embassy in London, the BBC's James Robbins said Mr Assange's assembled supporters were delighted.

    "The political temperature has risen very significantly. It is clear this is only the beginning of a very long legal contest," he said.

    And BBC legal correspondent Clive Coleman said there was now a "complete standoff" between the UK and Ecuador regarding the status of the embassy in London.

    He said the British government now had to make a decision, adding that the risks were enormous - including making other embassies around the world vulnerable.

    "I imagine the Foreign Office is awash with lawyers, discussing their options," said our correspondent.
    Sex offence accusations

    "I would be very surprised if that power was used - certainly in the short term," he added.

    Mr Assange entered the embassy after the UK's Supreme Court dismissed the Australian national's bid to reopen his appeal against extradition and gave him a two-week grace period before extradition proceedings could start.

    It was during that fortnight, while on bail, that he sought refuge.

    A subsequent offer by Ecuador to allow Swedish investigators to interview Mr Assange inside the embassy was rejected.

    The Wikileaks website Mr Assange founded published a mass of leaked diplomatic cables that embarrassed several governments, particularly the US's, in 2010.

    Earlier, the UK Foreign Office warned it could lift the embassy's diplomatic status to fulfil a "legal obligation" to extradite the 41-year-old by using the Diplomatic and Consular Premises Act 1987.

    That allows the UK to revoke the diplomatic status of an embassy on UK soil, which would potentially allow police to enter the building to arrest Mr Assange for breaching the terms of his bail.

    Mr Assange says he fears that if extradited to Sweden, he will then be passed on to the American authorities.

    In 2010, two female ex-Wikileaks volunteers accused Mr Assange, an Australian citizen, of committing sexual offences against them while he was in Stockholm to give a lecture.

    Mr Assange claims the sex was consensual and the allegations are politically motivated.'

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19281492